Leading and Managing a Differentiated Classroom Chapter 7 and Personal Article

If we as teachers truly want to help ALL of our students learn, then it is pretty clear that it is a teacher’s responsibility to seek the means for accomplishing such an objective.  It is so easy for teachers to hide behind a front of excuses that supposedly inhibit them from taking extra measures to ensure all of their students are having an equal opportunity to succeed.  It is easy to implement a content-based classroom and maintain an annual routine of regurgitating the same material and lesson plans.  What is not easy is going above and beyond for our students, taking the extra time to come up with new lesson plans that encourages a student-based classroom, taking the extra time to come up with innovative assessments and differing assignments, taking the extra time to grade for student effort and progress rather than simply completion and content.  What is not easy is stepping out of our comfort zone and inserting ourselves in a role in which we try to take the time to study our students and attempt to understand the underlying causes for their behavior or undesirable habits in a classroom.  Not to be cliché but it is pretty simple, yet complex.  Teachers simply need to constantly be evolving, changing their methods, and finding new means to engaging their students.  We need to be able to accommodate them and encourage true learning as opposed to simply giving them a grade.  An article written by Christina Samuels discusses how teachers are trying to help students with ADHD succeed in their classrooms, and some methods for accomplishing this are actually giving students Individualized Education Plans or 504 plans.  Other means, even though evidence illustrates that this support applies for only about 25 percent of all high school students, are taking the extra time to help students with learning strategies and study-skills.

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/speced/2014/10/study_high_schoolers_with_adhd.html

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